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marketing

Déjà vu

 

deja

If you were offered the opportunity to do something that could change healthcare and save lives, would you?

It’s never an easy decision when you’re already doing something you love, but it was too good of a chance to let it pass me by.

Early this year, I left the American Heart Association to work for an amazing enterprise software company, Sprinklr. Since then, I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to advise a handful of Fortune 500 organizations on creating and implementing digital strategies using our software. Plus, I’ve had the privilege of working with an amazing team who never, ever, ever, ever, ever give up on creating the best experience for their brands.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago – I got a note from someone I really respect at AHA about a new role. I wasn’t looking. I love #SprinklrLife. But I said I’d hear them out.

And the rest is history… again.

I’m heading back to the AHA as the Director of Marketing, for the Patient-Powered Research Network for the Institute of Precision Cardiovascular Medicine. It’s a position at the crossroads of innovation, tech, big data and healthcare. And I couldn’t be more thrilled to re-join an organization that is changing the face of healthcare.

It’s bittersweet – I still love Sprinklr and where it’s going. I still think it’s the best in the business and they have the best team on the planet. I will forever be their cheerleader. The best part: I still get to work with them as their client again.

So cheers to new beginnings, big changes and giant leaps. I’ve never been one to take the easy road. I love the excitement of doing something big, and taking on a new challenge. This is that opportunity. I’m looking forward to the future. Who knows where it will take me?

To answer a few questions I’ve already gotten…

So what will you be doing?

I get to lead the marketing for patient-centered research at the cross of big data, innovation and cardiovascular diseases and stroke. In normal fashion, it’s a new position that I get to help craft, and I couldn’t be more excited.

Didn’t you burn your work clothes when you started working from home?

Outside of a handful of my favorite dresses, I definitely slimmed down my wardrobe. Something tells me that yoga pants won’t cut it in this role, so I’m going shopping.

Going back to a past employer? How does that work?

Actually, it’s becoming quite popular. I recently found some research that shows more than 76 percent of employers are looking at past employees for new roles.

5 things future social media professionals should know

Every year, I have the wonderful privilege of speaking to a group future marketers at my alma mater, the University of North Texas.

Let’s take it back to when I was in college for a second. I was the cheezy kid in the second row (the first row seemed a little too presumptuous) asking all the questions. I was a nerd when it came to classes I was interested in. And the thought of getting to connect with well-networked people who were already in my field, was an idea that I loved.

When I started my career, social media was barely a thing. We had Myspace (I’m not that old), but the rest were yet to come. There definitely weren’t classes in social media.

My career started in public relations, at an agency.

I think agencies can be beneficial if you want to try a lot of things, for a lot of clients. My experience was valuable, but the grind wore me down and I wanted to move to the brand side of things and move to social media… which was a fantastic idea.

On the brand side, you get to dig deep and hone your skills. I was able to step in and build a social media program from scratch – growing it from a community of 38,000 to an audience of 60.4 million. It’s been quite a journey; and I couldn’t have done it without an amazing group of people along the way.

I’ve always been thankful for my mentors, family, former teachers and communications/social media friends who have supported me. I feel like I owe it to them to pass along the knowledge, advice and good vibes I’ve gotten along the way.

Now, it’s my turn on the other side of the desk.

It’s crazy to think that this year, millennials are expected to overtake the majority of the workforce according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. By 2030, the generation who won’t remember the time before dial-up is expected to make up 75 percent of the workforce.

The world has been changing the last decade, and social media has been leading the charge.

The newest graduates are joining the workforce as digital natives. And here’s some of the advice I gave to them:

  1. If you aren’t passionate about it, don’t settle for it. When I think about my career, there are three things I’ve needed to be successful (and it took me a while to figure this out, which is why I’m telling you now): the culture, the team/boss, the job. If you can find the trifecta, you’re set. Remember during interviews you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Find out as much as you can about all three to see if it’s a fit for your personality and work-style.
  2. Learn quickly and fail fast. Sorry to use corporate jargon, but it’s true. You’ll make mistakes. Take ownership. Move on. And don’t make them again. You’ll need to make an impact quickly to be successful. So find out what keeps your boss up at night and solve that problem.
  3. Have a plan. If you look at the most successful people in business, they have a plan of where they want their career to go. Each job you have in your journey should get you closer to that ultimate goal. Keep in mind that sometimes one step back will help you take two forward.
  4. Think about your personal mission. Do you have a personal mission statement? It’ll help you think about where you want to go. I want to squeeze every ounce I can out of life – both personally and professionally. This is what drives me: “Live life to its fullest – with integrity and passion in everything I do.”
  5. The best and brightest around you aren’t your enemies, they are your mentors. Find them and stick by them. They’ll show you the ropes. If you model your work-style after them, you’ll also be successful.

That time we used YouTube to fix the water heater

I should start off by saying hubs and I are not very domesticated.

I’ve tried my hand at Pinterest crafts and have created a handful of Pinterest fails.

Now that we have that out of the way… Shortly after we bought our first house, our water heater stopped working. Several calls to my dad later, we decided we should check the pilot light.

… Where is that?!

So, to YouTube I went. As my husband was crawling into the small space that contained our water heater with a lighter, I grew a bit nervous that he might blow us both up.

I found a video that showed how to fix a water heater pilot light without blowing yourself up. I stood as far away as possible, but close enough he could see my iPad.

Crisis averted. The pilot light lit. We didn’t become homeless. No one lost their eyebrows.

I was reminded of this story today when I read a new report from Think With Google. It says:

Today’s moms want show-not-tell answers in the moment.

And my silly story is a great example of that. If we can’t figure it out, we’ll Google it or look for a YouTube video on how to not blow ourselves up.

The report goes on to discuss how we should build content strategies to win moments that matter. There are moments in the customer journey that can act as a tipping point or a turn off. If you can win those, you have a new customer.

From the report:

Few moms have time to scour a dozen fashion magazines for the latest trends, or test drive a dozen different strollers around the store (while their toddler is crying). Instead, in those I-want-to-know, I-want-to-buy, I-want-to-domicro-moments, they’ll often turn to YouTube. Today’s moms want show-not-tell answers in the moment. And YouTube delivers.

It’s no wonder the most popular channels are those that focus on “how.”

The takeaway: Use your YouTube content strategy to teach moms how to do something in that micro-moment, and you’ll build a stronger following and more passionate consumer.

Let the cultivation begin!

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